Select Page
That, Which, or Who? The Clause is the Cause

That, Which, or Who? The Clause is the Cause

Before I get into the post, let me preface this by saying that there are no hard-and-fast rules when it comes to using that or which; however these are some good guidelines that are becoming widely accepted as the rules to follow. So while you technically might not be...
In To Vs Into: Simple Solution to a Common Issue

In To Vs Into: Simple Solution to a Common Issue

Into or in to? It’s a common question, but luckily this is one grammar issue that’s easily clarified. Into is a preposition which typically specifies some sort of motion, movement, or direction. I placed my books into my bag. A writer, an editor, and an agent walked...
The Serial (Oxford) Comma: When and Why To Use It

The Serial (Oxford) Comma: When and Why To Use It

One of the most argued topics of grammar is the use of the serial, or Oxford, comma. When to use it: sometimes, always, or never? I’m in the sometimes, leaning towards always, group. While it’s not always necessary to have a comma before the final conjunction (often...
You’re vs Your: A Distinct Difference

You’re vs Your: A Distinct Difference

Whether we’ve committed the act ourselves or just been a witness to the tragic event, I think that we can all agree that it’s about time that people started using your and you’re correctly. Yes, they are both pronounced exactly the same; however, they each mean very...
Its vs It’s: Easy Reference

Its vs It’s: Easy Reference

Its or It’s? When to use which? The incorrect use of these two words is a common grammar mistake, but it’s a mistake that can be easily rectified with a little explanation. Most of us know that when you form a contraction an apostrophe is used. In the case of it and...
Their, They’re, or There: A Simple Guide

Their, They’re, or There: A Simple Guide

The incorrect use of the words there, their, and they’re, is one of the most common grammar mistakes I come across, right alongside misuse of its and it’s, and your and you’re (which I’ll go over in a later posts.) For those of us aware of there correct usage, it’s...

Pin It on Pinterest